HomeExpert AdviceTim Stockdale – Chapter 7, Why a horse rushes, training a youngster not to rush and landing on the correct leads

Tim Stockdale – Chapter 7, Why a horse rushes, training a youngster not to rush and landing on the correct leads

Posted in Riding Schooling and Training Jumping

Featured Professional
Tim Stockdale

Tim is one of the country's foremost showjumpers and trainers, having represented Great Britain on over 50 occasions. He is a board member of British Showjumping and has served as Chef d'Equipe of the British team.

View Tim Stockdale's Biography

Whether your horse is a green youngster or an experienced showjumper with naughty habits, clear and consistent training practices are the key to achieving a well-trained horse.

Slow down!

Tim sets up five poles 3.5m apart. “Work on cantering through the five ground poles over a few days, until your horse is relaxed and soft in the contact. Then you can think about making the last pole into an upright.”

On the turn

The ability to ride good corners and sharp turns is paramount, especially when jumping in a tight arena or against the clock.

A‘ turn – This is used for simple turns, and involves bending the hrose around the inside leg, which helps maintain balance, rhythm and engagement behind.

B‘ turn – This is a straighter, tighter turn, and involves using the outside leg and outside rein (as in neck reining) to turn.

Leading the Way

Whenever you change direction after a fence, it’s important that your horse lands on the correct leading leg to enable him to make a nice, balanced turn. It effectively means changing leg in mid-air over the jump.

Your Comments

Newsletter Sign-up

Sign up now

Subscribe

January 2018

Latest Issue