Molly

Liz is a Recommended Associate of the Intelligent Horsemanship Association, and can help with behavioural issues
Molly
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Molly

Postby Molly » Fri Dec 14, 2012 8:27 pm

Molly who was last referd to as molly the mental has taken a turn for the better but i have a few questions to ask. Molly has been longreined scince the end of august and wasn't been ridden resently a good freind of my mums rode her just at walk then the next time a bit of trot and molly was fine, maybe a little worried but to be expected.I can ride molly at a walk round the yard but any were else and i don't think we would cope and i don't want to test the limits to much so that hopefully she won't bolt with me one otherwise we would go back to square one.my questions are:
Could I not be a strong enough rider for her?
Do I ride to diifrently to her last owner? would that effect the problem?
If she was in pain would she buck and rear ect (beacause she doesn't when she is ridden or long reined but she does in the field)?
Are there any back problems that the vet wouldnt be able to pick up that could be caused when you trot her?
Is there anything you would advise doing?
We are bonded with her would moving yards near new year be to much for her even though she regularly goes down to the school there?
Do you think we need to bond with her more?
Beacause she was only ridden by one ridder in her last home for over 5 yrs would she find it to difficalt to respond to diffrent people(I know it would be a shock not having that rider would would it have any long term effects)?
I hope that is not to many Questions If you need further details to answer some of the Questions just ask.
Robbyn :D

Expert_LizPitman
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Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:44 am
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Re: Molly

Postby Expert_LizPitman » Mon Dec 17, 2012 6:21 pm

Hi Robbyn,

Because you've asked lots of individual questions, I'll answer them within the following quote of your message. My answers are in blue. I hope they help!

Liz
Molly who was last referd to as molly the mental has taken a turn for the better but i have a few questions to ask. Molly has been longreined scince the end of august and wasn't been ridden resently a good freind of my mums rode her just at walk then the next time a bit of trot and molly was fine, maybe a little worried but to be expected.I can ride molly at a walk round the yard but any were else and i don't think we would cope and i don't want to test the limits to much so that hopefully she won't bolt with me one otherwise we would go back to square one.my questions are:
Could I not be a strong enough rider for her? I can't really say because I haven't seen you ride or how she reacts. There is a lot that can be done to help a pony understand what to do when we ask with certain aids but it takes skill and patience to teach it. Strength shouldn't come into it because there are better ways of teaching a pony to slow down when we ask. The question is more does she ask more questions of you than you know how to answer? It's ok to say yes and be honest. It's much better to do that than carry on bravely and have an accident.
Do I ride to diifrently to her last owner? would that effect the problem?Yes definitely to the first part. We all ride differently to one another, even top level riders have a different to horses. How you ride and how you feel to a pony can very much affect a problem, but more because of you yourself feel to her rather than that you feel different. If, for example, you are tense and you grip with your legs because you're scared to fall off, then Molly could understand that as meaning for her to go faster. Or, if she's worried about something and feels that you're worried too, it would make her even more worried!
If she was in pain would she buck and rear ect (beacause she doesn't when she is ridden or long reined but she does in the field)?Not necessarily. Just as we all act in different ways, so do ponies. Bucking and rearing can of course be signs that a horse is in pain but I have met many horses in pain who do neither of those things. If she is running about in the field having a good buck that's more like just letting off steam and having a good stretch, that is normal and I don't think is part o the problem. If she's bucking and kicking out at people when they try to catch her, for example, then it is a sign of her not wanting to come in, probably because of her work.
Are there any back problems that the vet wouldnt be able to pick up that could be caused when you trot her?Yes, there are back and other issues that are inside a horse that a vet can't see from the outside. Things like kissing spine, gastric ulcers, problems with ovaries or other organs can cause significant discomfort/pain, but can't be definitely diagnosed by looking at her or feeling her from the outside. A vet should, though, be able to see how she reacts to things, listen to what you describe, and watch her move and work, and then decide to do further investigations, such as x-rays or scans. A horse's skeleton and muscles move differently in each gait, so there are certainly things that a he could cope with standing or walking that hurt when trotting or cantering. There are also things that would hurt more when we're riding that are ok when either just in the field or working on longlines without a rider.
Is there anything you would advise doing? Yes, as I said in my reply on your other thread, I would strongly advise you to ask one of my collegues to come and do a proper assessment and give you advice that is based on what he or she can see for themselves, rather than me just giving you some general advice here. Our job is about looking at details with a pair of eyes that have years of experience with this sort of problem. I simply can't give you that sort of targetted advice by email. That would help with your other question about bonding. Because of the way we work, which is with the horse and owner together, you would be left with lots of things you could yourself carry on doing to help your relationship develop in the future.

Here is the list of trainers. You'll find them listed by area. All are great and all could help you with your problem. And they're all very, very friendly!


We are bonded with her would moving yards near new year be to much for her even though she regularly goes down to the school there?It's always stressful for a pony to move yards. As long as you support her during the move, though, it shouldn't be a greater issue than any other time a horse moves yards.
Do you think we need to bond with her more?Bonding is an ongoing thing. As you've not had Molly long, I'd say almost certainly there is more that could be done. Again, this is where a good groundwork trainer can help.
Beacause she was only ridden by one ridder in her last home for over 5 yrs would she find it to difficalt to respond to diffrent people(I know it would be a shock not having that rider would would it have any long term effects)?Ponies adapt incredibly well to changes of rider. As I said before, yes you will feel different. As long as you are riding well, though, and are not giving her confusing aids, or using your hands and legs too strongly, or are conveying your worry to her, she shouldn't be too upset by the change.
I hope that is not to many Questions If you need further details to answer some of the Questions just ask.
Robbyn :D


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