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ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 1:34 pm
by Jane_H&R_DeputyEd
Got a problem you need help with? It can be anything from riding to feeding, management to competing, behaviour to veterinary . . . you name it, we'll cover it in the magazine - and get an answer for you from one of our experts!

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Mon Oct 11, 2010 10:16 am
by HollyGee
Some horses occasionally get dapples on their coats at certain times of the year - is this to do with condition/health or is is just a marking that becomes more prominent at different times of the year?

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Thu Oct 14, 2010 3:15 pm
by Snipper
My gelding is incredibly chilled and friendly, and you can do absolutely anything with him. He loves a good scratch and cuddle, and despite being large, you could safely let children handle him etc. However, when out in the field with other horses, particularly if he doesn't know them very well, he can be utterly vicious! He really is like a totally different horse and probably the most aggressive I've ever seen a horse be. He will even charge with his ears pinned back at horses in the next field sometimes, skidding to a halt at the fence. If he is carefully introduced over a long period of time, he is able to go out with them, but the horse does need to be the sort who trots away when he approaches them. Even when he is getting on with another horse, they often come in from the field with war wounds!! And occasionally it gets to the stage when they have to be separated for a while again. Why is he like this?

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:36 pm
by Snipper
With the threat of a hay shortage, our yard stocked up. However, the hay we've got is full of thorns! Even if you just lightly touch it once you get a hand full of them and it's a struggle to full his nets. He seems to be eating it OK and the thorns are small and quite soft, but I wondered whether eating so many of them could cause him a problem?

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Fri Nov 05, 2010 10:49 am
by Calerux
Last winter my 18 year old welsh cob pony spent a considerable amount of time in a barn with 17 other horses due to the snow and personal injury. I noticed her breathing seemed different in the school, she coughed occasionally, became short of breath and gave off the impression that she was uncomfortable when being ridden. (Before this she was ridden 3/4 times a week so it wasn't due to unfitness). We called the vet out who concluded that she had a fast respiration rate and a very high white blood cell count. The dusty environment may have irritated her so I changed her bedding from straw to Bedmax, soaked the hay and fed from the floor. She was also put on antibiotics and Ventipullman. We moved to an outside stable and within 6 weeks she there was a dramatic improvement resulting in her being ridden without any sign of breathing difficulties. She then suffered a relapse and is no longer able to be ridden and within 7 months she has had 4 lots of antibiotics, endoscoped and scanned twice plus a sample taken from her trachea. Yet the infection has not been identified.She is currently on steroids for a month and then aloe vera. She looks healthy, very upbeat and has a good appetite. Has anyone else had similar problems and is there anything else I can do to make her more comfortable as we enter the next winter?

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 11:07 am
by Jane_H&R_DeputyEd
Hi

Am passing your enquiry on to one of our veterinary experts - sit tight, and I'm sure we'll have an answer for you soon!

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 12:01 pm
by don1982
I have a 6 year old Thoroughbred mare. She is an ex steeple chaser from Ireland. I have only had her for 5 months. About 3 weeks ago she had mild colic symptoms. My vet took her in to hospital and got a peritoneal tap and confirmed peritonitis. Then she got a Thrombosis in the artery where the catheter was vet had to put another one in the other side. Vet confirmed the peritonitis has cleared up with antibiotics, but the inflammatory markers in her blood are still very high. My vet has ex-rayed her lungs, ultra sound her abdomen, checked her liver and kidneys, white and red blood cell count and are all fine. They gave me two choices to take her home on two weeks antibiotics and she what happens. They will come back before they are finished and do another blood test to check inflammatory markers again or I could put her on the operating table. Vet said they are suspecting cancer or tumour or could just be an infection they can’t find taking longer to clear up. She seems fine in herself at the moment, eating and drinking passing faeces and urinating normal. I just need some advice I have her home now. Is there anything else you think it could be? Or where do I go from here? My vet also said that if there is something underlying then the peritonitis will come back when she comes off antibiotics. A couple of people said if that happened not to put her on operating table just have her put down.

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 2:22 pm
by LittleDollyPony
Am I too big for my pony? She is a hardy little welsh mountain cross and stands at just 12.2hh. She is 7 years old and I have had her since she was 5. I bought her off my riding school as she was completly unsuitable as a LR pony, having been broken as a four year old after being rescued. She was wild and everyone told me I was mad, her being my first pony and I had only been riding for 2 years, but had a certain spark and we have both come a long way together, she proving that she was increadibly intelligent and quick to learn with a desire to please. I am 15 years old, weigh roughly 7 stone and am 5'2andabit!. I don't want to be hurting my pony, is my physical size uncomfortable for her?

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 9:11 pm
by jjjurchi

Re: ASK THE EXPERTS

Posted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:55 am
by livibox
I have a 15.hh 6yro irish cob who has not done much schooling before i had him 4 months ago. I have recently started working on lunging in his normal snaffle bridle and he picked it up very well until recently, when he has began to misbehave. He has began to trot quite speedily and then will cut in quite sharply and come towards me, which can be a bit intimidating! I end up trying to keep my lunge whip near his head, so i am ready to wave it about when he tries to cut in. He also has began to get quite exciteable and will attempt to go at quite a speed, seemingly to intimidate me, as he is a very lazy horse. Any suggestions on how to stop him from coming in? is perseverence the key?